The Crapaud Exhibition Board would like to thank the Grade 5 students of Englewood School, with the support of Neila Auld, for completing this project and capturing some of Crapaud Exhibition's history.  The following quotes are from the students and the adult coordinator, Neila Auld.  Some of the pictures they collected can be see under our "Photo History"section.  Thank you for your part in preserving our local history.

 

As coordinator of this project, I must thank all those involved. Thank you to the TechPEI – Between Generations Project (who had the in-site to see the importance of such a project), the provincial government, for making it financially possible, to the community of Crapaud - who rallied behind the project and submitted old clippings and photos and “filled in the blanks” as we progressed, and to Englewood School – who saw Tuesday and Thursday evenings “taken over” by our group for three months. A special thank you to the Seniors and Grade Five students who participated. Each was instrumental in providing and collaborating the information, interviews and photos. To Mike Sherry, once an innocent computer student, I am sure he is convinced  to “stay away from Neila’s small projects” in the future. This was a learning experience, not just for the children and the Seniors, but for us all. The students, Seniors, Mike, and I hope you enjoy it.

I am counting on the children gaining an experience that will inspire them with a whole new appreciation for the Exhibition, and for those people who, for 49 years, have made it a continued success. The future of this event will rest on these students’ shoulders someday.  by Neila Auld

 

What I Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Adam Foy

I learned a lot about the exhibition. I learned that they do not really care about the money they care about the people who come to the exhibition to have fun and the best part is they can still pay all there bills! I found it interesting that everyone had a different answer for each question even when the question was the same. Each person thought that the exhibition was important to the community. I learned that it is that the exhibition keeps on going in the future.

Young people should take up the tradition of making the exhibition successful the exhibition needs lots of people young and old with lots of different interests to keep everyone coming.

I will take my kids to the exhibition too!

 

What I Have Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Alex Mill

I have learned that it is very important to the comunity. In 1954 George, as a farmer, entered his ‘short horn’ cattle into the competition ,but in subsequent years was busy just in the organization.

The first exhibition in Prince Edward Island was in 1820. There is lots of events like cow competitions.There is a parade in the exhibition and the parade gives pop and hotdogs.The exhibition is really fun,especially the tracktor pulls, and the food is also really good.

I think the exhibition is really important to everybody who comes to the exhibition.

If someone wanted to tear down the exhibition I would want to tell them that they can’t tear it down because it is important to the comunity.

 

What I have learned about the Crapaud Exhibition by Alex Watts

I have learned lots about the Crapaud Exhibition. The first Crapaud Exhibition ever held was August of 1954. The Exhibition was started by the people of Crapaud. I also learned that there are many events like the woodsman competition, the tractor pulls, and the cattle competition. Competitions that have gone out of the Exhibition are the "cow milking contest"and the "fun ride".The exhibition also has lots of stands to buy things for a drink or even for something to eat. In the 2001 Exhibition, They had a jail that if you gave them Money, You could put somebody in for twenty minutes. If you think of all the things that these people do to keep you amused, you aren’t including all of the money that it takes to keep the exhibition running, You’re talking about a lot of money. There is also a parade every year to tell people that the exhibition is coming.

 

What I Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Blaine Auld

I learned that the Crapaud Exhibition is very important to the community, and the first exhibition held on Prince Edward Island was in the year 1820, which means that Crapaud is very, very old; it came 2 centuries ago! The Women’s Institute is a group of women making fabulous for people at the exhibition. Most of the people working in setting it up never missed an exhibition. Competitions are also held in the Crapaud Exhibition. Some people even entered competitions when they were young! Presidents ran the Crapaud Exhibition. Sometimes, but very, very rarely, people (only 1) are killed in exhibitions from accidents. The people of the Crapaud Exhibition don’t work for money; they just want other people to have lots of fun. The Crapaud Exhibition has worked for 49 years. I will remember that the next time I go to the Crapaud Exhibition.

 

What I Have Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Brett Wood

I thought that the interviews with the elders were very interesting and fun. They were interesting because everyone had different answers for the same questions.

The Crapaud Exhibition was started to help raise local economy. We learned the Exhibition had many different events over the years. Some they don’t have now are the beauty contest, the midway and the horse swing. It was neat how different people had ideas for the Exhibition and worked to make it successful. I think the Exhibition is big now but Anna Stewart says the weather plays a big part. A long time ago they didn’t have the curling club to use for activities.

I think the exhibition has great value to the community because of the hundreds of people that come to see it and meet friends year after year. People also work hard to participate in the different things that interest them like the horse show , the crafts and baking, the animals and 4-H groups.

I like the Exhibition because I get to be with all of my friends. I really like the lawn tractor pull competition and going in it.

 

What I Have Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Brook Robblee

I learned the exhibition had a lot of people showing cattle and other farm animals. Mr. Best said it was hard to get the cattle to walk and do what you wanted.

The exhibition used to have 10 directors and now they have 24. The directors had to spend alot of their own time getting the grounds ready and cleaning up afterwards.

I like the parade and going on the float and throwing out the candy. After the parade we had hot dogs and pop.

 

What I Have Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Chelsey Condon

Almost everyone said the Exhibition was a lot of work getting started and at the same time, fun. The Seniors that were interviewed said the activities have changed over the years. There use to be a Ferris wheel, horse swing, pony rides, and still today we have the tractor pulls and the parade.

One time it rained and they thought the parade wouldn’t go. But the rain stopped ten minutes before the parade started, and when the parade stopped, it started raining again! In 1998 the parade route changed. It used to start at Englewood School, the go down by Harvey’s Clover Farm, and stop at Boyd MacDonlad’s Warehouse. Now it starts at Westmoreland Road and still stops at Boyd’s.

The cost to go to the Exhibition used to be $2.00, and now it’s $6.00 for adults and $4.00 for children 12 and under (pre-schoolers free). A sad part of the Exhibition was when a man was killed in the horse ring.

Everyone said in the interviews that the Crapaud Exhibition is important to the community.

 

What I Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Dillon Wight

I learned that the older people have interesting memories to hear about when they were little and themselves went to the exhibition. I learned that the admissions have changed greatly. It went from $2.00 to $6.00 so it costs more to get in as time has changed. I also learned that older people enjoy the dinners that they have there that the Women’s Institute provide. It is a lot of hard work to do the exhibition and no one gets paid - they are all volunteers. Some people go every year for 49 years. My Great Grandmother, Edith (Leard) Robinson, attended every opening of the exhibition, except one, since it started in 1954. A lot of people attend the Crapaud exhibition. The people think it is a lot of fun. It was the people who first thought of the idea of having an annual exhibition. The people of Crapaud enjoy having a community festival to wait for every year. One of the big events is the tractor pull a lot of farmers like entering the competition every year to see who wins; it is a lot of fun watching the tractor pull. That is what I learned about the Crapaud Exhibition.

 

What I Have Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Jillian Heffery

I learned that the crapaud exhibition is very important to our community and it is very fun to watch and see. It brings our community together. Lots of people win in lots of different events and competitions.

In 1954 August 25 the exhibition arrived at 5am there was 2,000 to 3,000 people that attended the fair. 1987 Admission to fair grounds was $3 for ages 12 and over and for people under 12 was $2, and pre-schooler's were free.

Hot dog’s and pop were served by the Crapaud fire department at the finish to the Crapaud exhibitions. Fair openings parade was at 10:30 am on Saturdays the Women’s Institute have been serving meals to as many as 1,000 people on exhibition day. Over 4,000 people attended in 1965 to make that one of the moss successful Crapaud Exhibition on records 1978. The Crapaud Expedition celebrates it’s silver 25th anniversary. It’s very importance to our community.

The exhibition as gotten bigger and bigger over the past years.

 

What I Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Logan Dawson

I learned when the first Crapaud Exhibition was, and who started it, which was Robert Dawson, Max Thompson, John Nicholson and William Waddell. Some people thought that it was started by the farmers so they could show their tractors and their animals. I learned that it used to be on a Wednesday and now it’s on a Saturday. I learned about competitions that I have never seen before, like the cow milking competitions, and the flower competitions. The cool part is in the first exhibition, the Women’s Institute made all the food and they still do it now!!!!!! Anna Stewart told us about the horse merry-go-round which was ran by a real horse going around in a ring with a driver. It used to be $2.00 and now it’s a lot more expensive, $6.00!!!! The exhibition brings the community together. Anybody who goes to the exhibition, usually makes friends, especially the people that work there!!!!! All these people who work there, don’t work for the money, they work for the fun of it!!!!

 

What I Have Learned About the Crapaud Exhibition by Meagan Toole

Almost all the people that we interviewed said it was a lot of work getting it started. They also said it was fun too. At first it was hard because there wasn’t a lot of volunteers but as the years went on more people wanted to be a part of it. All the people who work at the exhibition are volunteers. None of them get payed to help work. There once was even a man who got killed in a horse ring. He fell of the horse and then the horse fell on him. A lot of the activities have changed over the years. The Women’s Institute is a big part of the Crapaud Exhibition because they make the supers for all the people who come. Still after all this time the meals are still free on Friday nights. There used to be a Ferris wheel and a pony swings but they don’t have them anymore. I interviewed Amy Howatt, and she gave me a lot of information on the Crapaud Exhibition also interviewed Gerald Best. The people I interview them with were Jillian J and Brook R. Everyone I interviewed said that the Crapaud Exhibition was a lot of hard earned work, but it was always fun.

This is most of what I learned while I was researching and learning about the Crapaud Exhibition. I Had a lot of fun doing this project.

 

What I learned about the Crapaud Exhibition by Sarah Ferguson

I have a lot of respect for the men & women who started the Crapaud Exhibition.

I have learned it was alot of hard work but well worth it . William Waddell one of the original directors he never missed one exhibition .Willam gave me alot to think about ,I learned alot from him. I feel the Crapaud Exhibition is very important to our Community, it not only brings our community together but all surrounding Communities .We, as the youth, will try to keep the Crapaud Exhibition going.

 

Introduction

 

“The Crapaud Exhibition came into being as a result of the visionaries of agriculture forming partnerships for the development of the Industry and the building of the community”.

President Elmer MacDonald, July 1995

 

Crapaud is located in the midst of Prince Edward Island rural life on the Trans Canada Highway, 18 kilometers from the Confederation Bridge and midway between the eastern and western tips of the Island. Agricultural Exhibitions have a long history in Prince Edward Island, and none longer than in the small community of Crapaud. As far back as January 16, 1903, it is recorded that the first exhibition to be held in Prince Edward Island took place in Crapaud in the year 1820. Prior to this date, on October 23, 1867, under the patronage of Lady Westmoreland, the Westmoreland Fair was also held on the grounds of the old Crapaud School. This event drew upwards of 1000 people to view displays that included: cattle, horses, sheep, hogs, farm equipment, grains (barley, oats, buckwheat), black homespan, butter, cheese, fruits and vegetables. A musical band was in attendance, and the Fair was enjoyed by one and all. Hence, a seed was planted in the hearts of everyone in the community.

 

The concept of staging an annual Exhibition in Crapaud was initially conceived in the autumn of 1953 by Robert Dawson, of Crapaud, and Max Thompson, of Victoria. The Crapaud rink had recently been opened and offered the perfect venue. Bringing their idea to the Crapaud-Victoria Board of Trade, on June 4, 1954, the Crapaud Exhibition Association was organized and incorporated that same year on June 17, with ten members. Each member paid $10.00, to provide some funds to get the organization “up and running”.

 

The First Annual Crapaud Exhibition was held in August of 1954 with more than 3,000 people attending. Entries poured in beyond the hopes and expectations of the Association. The Women’s’ Institutes of Crapaud, Westmoreland and Lady Fane assured dinners were of the highest quality. The “entry fee” for exhibiting product, was 10% of your “winnings”, and the Fair netted a surplus of between $4-500. Max Thompson, then President, and John Nicholson, as Vice-President, spoke of their great satisfaction with the show and their hopes of seeing it continue as a permanent function. The exhibition hasn’t looked back since. With 49 years of dedication by a multitude of volunteers, the Crapaud Exhibition has built a reputation as one of the finest country fairs in the Atlantic Region.

 

Each director over the years has taken a specific responsibility to assure the Fair is a success. Whereas the entire community contributes in some way, the directors take on responsibilities far-reaching . . . someone decorates the stage, sets up chairs and tables, builds the pens, makes sure the sound equipment is in place, assures prizes are collected, the events and exhibits are in place (and of high quality) the advertising is done, parking is organized, animal feed made available, and the water supply  and electricity is adequate. It even includes making sure the washroom facilities are clean and sufficient (ordering enough “Johnny-on-the-Spots). In the heat of the sun, someone needs to find fans for the fiddlers – chances are it is a director. It is this “hidden work” that makes the Exhibition the success it is. It is this same “hidden work” that brings the community together for a common goal. After it is all over, these same directors take everything down, clean up (right down to the manure piles!), assess the successes and failures, and begin plans for the next, improved, Crapaud Exhibition.

 

Security became an issue in later years, for the protection of exhibits and for safety during the day. The St. John’s Ambulance gives support, as do the Firemen for First Aid. The Exhibition is a “window of the area” – for its livestock, goods, crafts, 4-H, talent, etc. and serves to assist the Minor Hockey, Firemen, and the Women’s Institute gain revenue to carry out their charitable community projects year-round.

 

Politicians and Dignitaries were always invited to the official opening. They included the Lieutenant Governor, the Premier, the Minister of Agriculture, MP for Queens, MLA for Queens, the Senator of the Day, and the Member of the Opposition. Fortunately, many responded positively and attended. In 1990, Prime Minister Jean Cretien attended with Premier Catherine Callbeck. The late Senator Heath Macquarrie, from Prince Edward Island and a summer home in Victoria, attended faithfully until the last several years.

 

The Exhibition has seen many changes over the years, but what hasn’t changed is the importance it has to the community and its people. It brings a community together once a year for an event that has everyone converging on the grounds and working to make it a success. If you live in Crapaud, you don’t miss the Exhibition, and you take your holidays before or after. If you’re from Crapaud, and have “moved away”, chances are you plan your holidays to come home to the Exhibition. Farmers display their product, people exhibit “their goods”, the community is entertained, and all ages enjoy the festivities.

 

Today in 2002, we again have a new rink opening, as we had in 1953, but this time there are twenty-four members/directors on the Crapaud Exhibition Association – over double the original ten. The Exhibition is at a crossroads with its 49th anniversary, but given its history, and the commitment from the community – it will surely take the road best traveled!

 

Events, Exhibits, Competitions & Highlights

 

On August 25, 1954 Exhibits began to arrive at 5 a.m. with the following exhibits registered: 264 cattle, 44 hogs, 43 horses, swine, poultry, fruits and flowers, fruits and vegetables, approximately 200 house-crafts and 200 home baking goods. The first Exhibition goers were also treated to Tractor Rodeo, Highland Dancing and Step Dancing Competitions on an outdoor stage. It was estimated that between 2,000 and 3,000 people attended the fair. Prizes paid out amounted to almost $1,400. Accommodations for the animals were a concern, and long lines of poles and planks were placed for cattle and horses. Pens were built for hogs, and crates held the poultry. Tables and racks were built in the rink to display baking, handicrafts, vegetables, flowers, fruit, etc. The Crapaud Women’s Institute took charge of all exhibits inside the rink, which included poultry.  The Prince Edward Island 4-H youth have been a part of the Exhibition since “day one”, and this has grown to be a major event.

In 2002, participants now come from, not only across Prince Edward Island, but also across Atlantic Canada. While some events and competitions have been removed, added or altered in size, many are the mainstay, including horses, 4-H displays, beef and dairy cattle, poultry, sheep, table stock and seed potatoes, fruits and flowers, assorted domestic sciences (baking, pickling, etc), needlework and handicraft, photography and a scholastic competition for various school ages. The Woodsman’s Competition has also become a popular and favourite event.

The Antique Engine Display has grown to one of the largest east of Montreal, and in recent years has become a regular display, as has the “Rising Stars Competition”.

Profits from the exhibition are small. In 1954, there was an overall profit of between $4-$500. Since then, profits rarely exceed $1500, and some years there have even been losses. The directors have made a commitment to grow as they can afford. The importance is in maintaining and sustaining a quality Fair. The Competitors do not enter for the dollar value of the prize, they enter for the love of rural living, farming and to be recognized for the quality of their work. To date the monetary value of the prizes remain small, and are generally a “ribbon”. For many, the value lay in the improved market value of their livestock or product, should a ribbon be won. For others, it is simply for the enjoyment of it.

Over the Years

1955: Eighty-seven horses were shown with Stanley Mayhew of Kinkora showing seventeen. Clifford Sherren, of Hampton, had the “best” horse of the show. Cattle classes included Shorthorns, Guernseys, Hereford and Angus and Holsteins. Also on display were Swine and Handicrafts.

1956: The livestock displays continued, and Handicrafts saw Mrs. Wendell Phillips win five ribbons. Domestic Science included culinary masterpieces (Mrs. Clayton Stevenson winning four red ribbons), fruit and flowers, and field roots class (Parker Jewell winning five red ribbons). The exhibition saw a profit of $1081.30. 500 posters were printed and distributed, and a sound system was introduced – advertising too effect.

1957: A vaudeville show was held inside the Jones Cattle Arena, following judging of fifteen herds of cattle and “Hooper Brothers” of Rustico had the most honors with twenty wins. Max Thompson and Allison Lea of Victoria had the reserve senior and reserve grand male champion in Romondale Re-echo Sovereign. Also in 1957, Mr. Brian Lewis (Cascumpec), known as “The Swing Man”, introduced the Horse Swing to the exhibition. It was an event loved by all children. This year saw a net profit of $1115.03. In 1957 the directors approved a plan to erect a building for canteen and storage purposes, and would lease the land from the Crapaud Rink Company.

1958: The exhibition only saw a profit of $689. That was followed in 1960 with a loss of $699.70, and 1962 a profit of $409. 1964 only saw a profit of $16.45.

1959: The ladies’ “cow milking contest” was introduced, where ladies held a bucket and competed to see who could fill the pail the fastest. In 1959, the tractor pull was eliminated.

1960: Stewart Wright, Deputy Minister of Agriculture considered the Crapaud Exhibition “a permanent fair”. Prize money awarded amounted to $3,000, which qualified them for federal financial assistance (80% of the prize money). In 1960 the exhibition netted a loss, and directors realized the exhibition needed t make some changes if it was continued. Scouts were paid $25 to park cars in a filed owned by Ralph Myers.

1961: A potato show was added, the pony show was enlarged, and the vegetable show improved. Canteen services were tendered to various Women’s Institutes, with Argyle Shore operating outside until 1964.

1962: The “4-H” building is built at a cost of $3,000 (approved in 1957). The directors realized more land would be needed to be considered a Grade B Class Exhibition.

1963: The Ice Cream Booth arrives at the Crapaud Exhibition.

1964: There were about 50-58 horses entered and the Bonshaw Women’s Institute offered hotdogs. The Crapaud Exhibition Association sold land to the curling club group to build upon. The conditions included that if the Curling Club went out of business, the land and buildings would revert to the Exhibition Association, and should the Exhibition decide to disperse their present land and buildings, the Curling Club would be given first opportunity to purchase the land (60ft wide x 300ft long), immediately west for a price not to exceed $500. Construction started and the Crapaud Curling Club opened in 1967.

With Dawn Thompson (MacFadyen) as “den mother”, the Miss Crapaud Exhibition Contest ran for five years – between 1971 and 1975.

1971: Kay Dixon is crowned “Miss Crapaud Exhibition”.

1972: Audrey Lynn Dawson wears the crown of “Miss Crapaud Exhibition”.               Chosen Princesses included Maribeth Grant (Miss Borden Pharmacy) and Rita Boulter (Miss Victoria Yacht Club).

1973: The Miss Crapaud Exhibition title was held by Suzanne MacLeod (Oakes).

1962: Bryce Boswall was “gored” by an Ayrshire bull (named “Cherry Bank Royal Anchor”, and was transported, by ambulance, to hospital.

1965:  There was an entertainment “Midway” that brought enjoyment to all, especially the children. Prior to the arrival of the Midway, children were entertained with a “horse swing” – a swing run in a circular pattern and powered by a horse.

1972: The Horse Show was the event of the day, with 27 classes and over 30 entries in some classes, including costume class, rescue race, jumper division and English and Western division. 1972: Audrey Lynn Dawson is crowned Miss Crapaud Exhibition. Chosen Princesses were Maribeth Grant (Miss Borden Pharmacy) and Rita Boulter (Miss Victoria Yacht Club). There were farm exhibits, 4-H and Women’s Institute exhibits.

It was in 1972 when the Exhibition moved from Wednesdays to Saturdays.

1973: “Miss Crapaud Exhibition, Suzanne MacLeod, tried her hand in the ladies “cow milking contest”.

1978: Max Thompson declares - “The horse show now is possibly one of the greatest attractions”. Cattle (first) prizes have changed from  $8.00 to $30.00. This year the Fair was held on September 1st, the first year it was not held in the month of August.

1980: Tractor Pulling was introduced to the Island in 1980, as part of the Crapaud Exhibition.

 

1984: All witnessed (horse) jumper and equestrian events, as well as the 4-wheel drive competitions rescheduled due to wet grounds. Also this year, the chainsaw competition was introduced with Ian Dennison of Victoria as overall champion.

1985: this year brought the first sunny Saturday in three years to the Crapaud Exhibition. The winner for “Best Exotic Bird” went to Malcolm MacKenzie. The “Woodsman Competition” was a part of this year’s events, and included logrolling. The 4-wheel drive truck pull was again a key event and for the first time ever, there was a lawn tractor pull, thanks to the contributions of Elmer MacDonald and Randy Myers. Randy designed and constructed the lawn tractor drag at his own cost. That year, Byron Stewart of Crapaud won the event by pulling the 1,000-pound drag 130 feet with his Massey-Ferguson lawn tractor. A Western Horse Show was held, and a tug-of-war competition. The 4-H Tractor Rodeo was added. The “Midway” returned, and proved to be a popular attraction for all ages in 1985. Buster’s Amusements from Amherst, Nova Scotia was the highlight. Five rides, including the ever popular Ferris wheel and tilt-a-whirl were present. There were 20 booths of exhibits in the arena, and a “Scholastic Competition” was introduced, and sent to the schools.

Also during 1985, workers from “Canada World Youth Group” contributed to the exhibition – coming from across Canada and Bolivia. This year, hats were ordered with stitching, and 17 were given by the Women’s Institute to the Canadian and Bolivian workers. Admission at the gate is now $3.00 for adults, under 12 years is $2.00 and preschoolers are free.

1986: The “Woodsman Competition” continued as a popular event at the Crapaud Exhibition in 1986, serving as part of points system for the provincial woodsman’s title. The Heavy Horse Ring was there, as well as the Fire Departments of Kinkora, North River, Victoria and Crapaud for a “Tug-of-War” competition. The Scholastic Competition also continued in 1986. This year there was no English horse show – only Western. The Firemen and Minor Hockey ran games on Exhibition Day.

1987:  The Exhibition Association take a new office in the basement of the curling club. The President, Elmer MacDonald, stressed the importance of “new ideas” to sustain the event. A children’s “pie eating contest” was held late in the day on Saturday. Plans began to build “grand standing seating”. The Tryon Women’s Institute held a “Talent Auction” and a popcorn wagon was added to concessions. In 1987, admission to the Fair grounds was $4 for ages 12 and over, $2 for under 12 and pre-schoolers free, still a “bargain” for a full day’s entertainment. Minor Hockey ran games for the children. In 1987 the Firemen had a concession “canteen” as a fund-raiser. The Heavy Horses were there, and Ruth Ross held a dance competition.

1988: The Women’s Institute have an Ice Cream Booth and arrange outdoor children’s activities. Minor Hockey had game booths and set up the Scholastic Competition. Te directors continued to look for ways to improve and revitalize the exhibition. 

1989: The “125th Descendants Horse Show” performed. This show, which is termed a Class Six Event by the Canadian Equestrian Federation, featured both English and Western riding. The Heavy Horses were still here. The “Anne of Green Gables’ Tea Party was a popular event for young girls, with local Jennifer Morrison playing “Anne”. Indoor exhibitors and vendors increased at the Exhibition, seeing many local vendors display their art and crafts in a Craft Fair on Friday evening and Saturday. There was a display of antiques and prizes from the 1867 Westmoreland Fair and the 1954 Fair. Admission goes to $4 (12 and over), $2 (under 12) and pre-schoolers free. The Exhibition moves to Friday evening and Saturday – with Friday admission set at $4 for over 12 years, and under 12 free. There was no Mid-way in 1989.Two Fathers of Confederation were booked to attend the event.

1990: Heavy Horses, 4-wheel drive truck pull and lawn & garden tractor pull and the Woodsman’s Competition, and indoor exhibitors and vendors in the Craft Fair were part. Step Dancing competitions continued, and a children’s “Leprechaun Tea Party” was held, fitting the theme “Akin to Ireland”. 4-H Public Speaking winners were placed immediately after the official opening to speak, and have continued to do so. “Lip-Synch” was introduced, as was the Firemen’s Fashion Show. Other new initiatives included a food fair and Nintendo challenge. In 1990 the directors added an “Information Booth” to assist visitors in finding their way around the grounds. There is a food Fair in the Curling Club rink area, a petting zoo is a highlight, and the Canadian Association of Exhibitions sponsored the Island Talent Search. Gate fees are set at $5 for over 12 yrs, $2 under 12yrs, and pre-schoolers free. The Friday gate charge is dropped. There is a photography competition, and a children’s face painting is added. The Ayshire competition is cancelled, and some cattle are changed to a “display” rather to a “competition” – the numbers of entries in this area are declining.

1991: The Woodsman’s Competition was no longer a part of the Exhibition. A “Food Fair” combined with the Craft Fair in the area. There was a Stationary Engine display, and for the children - a 4-H Scavenger Hunt, tea party, Nintendo Challenge, etc. in the curling club. There were pony and donkey rides, as well as the Petting Zoo.

 

1992: The “pot bellied pig” and other “exotics” were a hit. The Department of Fisheries entered a fish tank display. The Heavy Horse show was present, and a Holstein Class was added.

 

1993: The Western Horse Association showcased. Classes included pleasure, Light Horse Show &barrel racing, trail, reining, western riding and showmanship. The Maritime Barrel Racing Association’s jackpot was featured as well. Prizes amounted to $5,000. The Step Dancing Competition was expanded to include the Hubley Dancers,  “Clogging” and “Square Dancing”. In 1993 the “Heavy Horses” had no competition, it was a demonstration. There was a Heavy Equipment display. Laser measuring equipment, sheep sheering and Exotic Birds. The outdoor stage is moved inside the arena.

 

1994: Two new events were introduced, Ice Carving, with Hans Vandergaag, and a children’s talent show called “Rising Stars”. This popular children’s musical competition continues today. There was a pie eating contest and a “tug of war”. Joe Murphy acted as clown, and Mary Burke offered “Read Canada” for the smaller children. A shrub garden was on display at the main entrance.

 

1995: The Boswall family demonstrated their sheep-shearing techniques, and a bread-making contest using bread machines was introduced. The Maritime Barrel Racing Association featured some of its best horses in the region, with prize money in this event alone at $5,000. Rabbit shows began this year, and a new feature, “the rolling pin toss”. An on-site “reading tent” was available for children Another new event was the P.E.I. Agility Dogs event, with 12 to 16 dogs running a course of timed-jumps.

 

1995: 4-H has become a major participant at the annual Fair. In 1995 all 4-H members in P.E.I. were eligible to take part in the 4-H section of the Crapaud Exhibition. Members submitted entries in numerous categories, including beef & dairy display, baking, wreaths & decorations for all seasons, hand-crafts, hooked rugs, needlecrafts, and public speaking. Opening ceremonies in 1995 witnessed two top public speakers of 4-H, Rebecca Hooper and Amy MacRae. “Super Dogs” entertained everyone and Frontier College offers a children’s reading program. There was also a “tree planting” exercise. Clifford Chappell provided the petting zoo, and the “Duck Pond” was once again a part. The sow & swine demo was not held. Some new events included the rolling pin toss, bread making, mini horse show, and the teeter-totter competition. Snow Cones were available.

 

Gate fees were $5.00/$3.00.

 

The “Rising Stars Competition” became a formal event in 1996, seeing various youth trying for “Grand Star” of the event.

 

1996: Danielle Ross wins for “Dance”

1997: Laura Robertson & Christine MacKinnon – Dance Duo

1998: Randi Doyle – Solo

1999: Britany Banks – Solo

2000: Samantha MacKinnon & Tory Burke – Song & Dance

2001: Evan MacQuarrie – Solo (without accompaniment)

           

1996: First place in the Rising Star Competition, which had 16 entries, went to dancer Danielle Ross. Second was Laura Pineau. Also in 1996 there was a special $50 prize for the women’s group with the most entries in “Domestic Sciences”. A large sand box was provided for the children. From Land and Sea to You and Me, was the theme and included a new display with sushi from Helen Green’s Homestay and English School. Fish was provided by Hidden Valley Char, Brookvale. Waddell’s Poultry, Crapaud, featured spicy chicken wings.  Bruce Lewis featured his grandmother’s fish cakes and Maureen Martin was there with home baking, in the exhibit area. About 50 antique engines were on display, coming from Nova Scotia and PEI, which has become a growing part of the Exhibition, and there was talk of participants coming next year from the USA. New to 1996 was an “Information Booth” to direct and inform people attending the event. Flyers were also mailed out to the local area, with a schedule of events. There was a very special display of Massey Harris equipment – celebrating the 150th anniversary of its founding.

 

The Scholastic Competition was removed, and there was an Art Competition in its place, a dog show also was held.

 

1997: the “Woodsman’s Competition”, last held in 1990, was revived and over 25 lumberjacks attended from across the Maritimes. This included the axe throw, swede (buck) saw competition, the kettle boil and several other contests involving both chopping and sawing. Even now, costs remain low for admission ($5.00/$3.00), and most children’s games costing only 25 cents to play. Additionally in 1997 there were many commercial displays, including a demonstration of the preparation of sushi, and a seafood demonstration, Out of the Sea and Over the Coals, by the Department of Fisheries. From Land and Sea to You and Me also offered a taste-testing booth. A giant sand play-box and face painting treated youngsters, as did a free tea party and games at 25 cents. T-shirts designed by Brian Stewart were made available. Horses from the three Maritime Provinces as well as Quebec and Maine competed in the ever-popular barrel racing and pole bending classes and totaled about 50. Laura Robertson & Christine MacKinnon were “Grand Stars” of the Rising Stars Competition.

 

The Crapaud Firemen displayed their “Smoke House” on site.  There was a children’s prize wheel and cupcakes. The Western Horse Association saw 53 horses compete, and ten were from Maine (only 6 from PEI). The sheep and goats made “quite a display”.

 

1998: “Grand Star” of the Rising Star Competition was Randi Doyle. Winners of the children’s’ colouring contest was Robbie Diamond of Nine Mile Creek and Alyssa Farrar of Hampton. Sushi demonstrations continued, and for the children, the usual was there as well as cookie decorating and “Buttons the Clown”. There was no longer a Firemen Canteen this year, and it is taken over by the Exhibition Association. Minor Hockey also has a canteen on site. The Firemen continue to provide water for the track and also two certified First Aid people.

 

Joe Tobin provided a woodworking demonstration, and the Western Horse Show was a two-day event, with the largest show to date, with 70 horses. Young scientists Ellen Oakes, Matthew Craig, and Rachael Cutcliffe attended the opening, winners from Englewood School and the Provincial Science Fair. Cecil Godfrey brought back the sow and swine display. There was a Dog Obedience Show, barrel racing, pole bending and public speakers Randi Doyle and Shannis MacDonald from 4-H.

 

1999: This year’s exhibition additions included oyster shucking John Bill, CBC’s Roger Younker presenting From Soups to Nuts, sushi again prepared by Japanese students from Helen’s Homestay and English School, and Hans Andergaag, chef, from the Culinary Institute. Britanny Banks was the “Rising Star”, and Brianne Lewis and Randi Doyle were the 4-H public speakers. A new area was set for the quilt and afghan display, and Roxanne Rawlings played clown.

 

In Domestic Science, there was an “Island Bread Making Contest”, with the winning entries taste-tested at the Land & Sea booth. There was no dog show this year

 

2000: The Rising Star Competition continued as a popular event for local youth, with Samantha MacKinnon & Tory Burke winning top honours for a song & dance. CBC’s Roger Younger and Hans Andergaag from the Culinary Institute featured Kabobs using Island beef and vegetables. Again, sushi and “Out of the Sea and Over the Coals” seafood demonstrations were enjoyed by all. 25 cent children’s’ games continue. A puppet show is added to the 4-H demonstrations. Also in this year, the largest antique engine show in Eastern Canada is presented. Included are a number of antique tractors from 1930-1950 and other antique machinery pieces.

 

There was an Alpaca and Llama display, with the Ladyslipper Dancers on stage Saturday afternoon. A magician was on site, peavey log roll, and Nancy Adams presented basket weaving in a demonstration and sale.

 

2001: Events continued to include 4-H demonstrations/competitions, barrel racing and pole bending, poultry and rabbit judging, lawn tractor and 4-wheel drive truck pulls, cattle, Woodsman’s Competition and more. Out of the Sea and Over the Coals, sushi, numerous children’s activities, Rising Star Competition, sheep and swine displays and other commercial booths.  New this year was the peavey log roll – testing competitors’ ability to work in pairs and to control a 12-foot log along a rolled course. The Annual Maritime Barrel Racing Championship takes place, with the top horses from Maine, NS, NB and PEI taking part. Evan MacQuarrie was the “Rising Star winner” for a solo without accompaniment.

 

Opening ceremonies offered speeches from Laura Brown and Randy Doyle, winners at the PEI 4-H Communications Competitions.

 

Other events and competitions that developed over the years included needlework and hand-crafts, photography and flower classes, Nintendo Challenge, Pony & Donkey Rides, and Sports Challenge. While tractor pulling was introduced as a part of the Exhibition, it grew beyond lawn tractors and truck pulls, and moved to a separate community event  in 1980 (the week-end following the Exhibition), involving major tractor entries. However the PEI 4-Wheel Drive Track and Lawn Tractor Pulls still take place during the Crapaud Exhibition. The traditional Handicraft and Domestic Science display/demonstrations continue to take place annually.

 

Gate fees are free on Friday evening, and $6.00 for adults, $4.00 for children under 12 years, and pre-schoolers free on Saturday.

 

Historically Significant Events

 

1955: The Crapaud Exhibition Association purchased a strip of land from the “Crapaud Rink Company” (75ft wide x 300ft long) for $200. Another parcel of land was purchased from Arthur Simmons, when he was negotiating with Irving Oil to sell the property for the (former) Irving gas station in Crapaud.

1960: the Federal Department of Agriculture drastically reduced the number of cattle allowed to be entered by individual farmers. While some farmers would submit 25 head of cattle, they were reduced to 8. But, government would subsidize 50% of the prizes, if these rules were followed.

1964: Lieutenant Governor MacDonald presented the following century farms with a “Century Plaque”:

  • Norman MacDonald – Crapaud

  • Stewart Sherren – Crapaud

  • Louis Hagan – Kelly’s Cross

  • Sterling Waddell – Kelly’s Cross

  • George Nicholson – Crapaud

  • Walter Wood – Mount Tryon

  • William Waddell – Crapaud

  • Wrixon Moone – Westmoreland

  • Asher Howatt – Tryon

  • Elmer Inman – Hampton

  • Harold Howatt – Augustine Cove

  • John MacQuarrie – Hampton

  • Archie Thompson - Tryon

1965: Over 4,000 people attended and made what is deemed one of the most successful Crapaud Exhibitions on record.

1967: The Crapaud Curling Club, started in 1964, opens, and offers a new venue for the Crapaud Exhibition.

1972: This Exhibition became known for one plagued with problems: the number of entries were down; the death of one of the competitors in the horse show; the mid-way failed to show; washroom facilities were at a premium; a box car on the rear of a truck, carrying a horse, fell and landed on a passer-by; a small child was scalded by hot coffee; and the carbonation for the pop machine had trouble.

1973: The “Centennial” is celebrated for PEI joining Confederation. 

1975: The Prince Edward Island Association of Exhibitions was formed.

1976: Max Thompson, founder and President of the Crapaud Exhibition for 25 years, was instrumental in forming the P.E.I. Association of Exhibitions, of which he was also President, in 1976.

1978: The Crapaud Exhibition celebrates its silver (25th) Anniversary. Max Thompson, President for those 25 years, receives a plaque recognizing his contribution to the Exhibition.

1980: The Exhibition moves from being held the end of August to the end of July.

1985: The 32nd Exhibition was dedicated to the late Max Thompson, who had died that May. Gary Boswell won for the champion yearling ram “Woodstock”, unique because the ram was raised on a bottle.

1986: At age 94, Susie Moore helps with the cold-plate suppers, something she had done for all 33 years of the Crapaud Exhibition.

1988:  The “Managing Committees” decreased to four ( 4-H, Livestock, Grounds, and Tractor Pull Chair). This primarily because the level in entries in the traditional exhibits like specific cattle breeds, hogs, handicraft, baking, field crops, poultry, flowers, etc. had decreased in size, and no longer required specific managers and committees. Directors chair the four committees remaining.

1989: The “125th Descendants Horse Show” was a part of the Exhibition – commemorating the 125th anniversary of the “1864 Charlottetown Conference”. The Fair moves to two days, Friday evening and Saturday. There was a “disaster fund” set up by the PEI Association of Exhibitions to assist provincial exhibitions that may run into expenses  beyond their control.

1993: Members of the P.E.I. Antique Engine, Tractor and Machinery Association put their largest (to date) display of its kind in Eastern Canada, at the Crapaud Exhibition. In 1993 the Canadian Association of Exhibitions held their meeting in Charlottetown. Also this year, Holland College Graphics Arts students designed a “logo” for the exhibition. For 4-H in Prince Edward Island, 1993 was their 75th anniversary and the participants provided free cake and ice cream at the Fair.

1995: John Walker received the “Exhibition Coordinator Award of Distinction”, from the Prince Edward Island Association of Exhibitions. It signifies a member’s participation in their Fair for a minimum of ten years, providing distinguished service in terms of dedication and leadership in programs or activities, and generally promoted the best interests of the Fair. At the Exhibition, the Crapaud Women’s Institute was recognized as the first recipients of the “Citizens of the Year Award”. Also in 1993, the Crapaud Exhibition received the “Local Fair of the Year Award” at the Canadian Association of Exhibitions Awards ceremony.

1996: Elmer MacDonald (Exhibition President) was inducted into the Atlantic Agricultural Hall of Fame. Elmer was also President of the P.E.I. Association of Exhibitions from 1991 to 1994. He was also second vice-president of the Canadian Association of Exhibitions. The members of the Englewood School Class of 1976 held their 20th Anniversary at the Crapaud Curling Club. Also in 1996, Kevin Shaw, Crapaud Fire Chief, was presented with this year’s “Citizens of the Year Award” at the opening – for the Crapaud Fire Department members who recently celebrated their 50th anniversary.

CBC television came to this year’s exhibition to tape the Wayne Rostad Concert, and CBC Television’s news anchor, Peter Mansbridge, had his tie auctioned off.

1997: P.E.I. Government conveys approximately 4.8 acres of land to the Crapaud Exhibition Association, following 20 years of leasing.

1998: Elmer MacDonald, President of both the Crapaud Exhibition Association and the Canadian Association of Exhibitions was awarded (by Adele Moore of the PEI Exhibition Association) the Gordon Awde Memorial Award. This is a Humanitarian award, Canada wide, and was presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Association of Exhibitions. By 1998 there were 24, as compared to the original 10, directors on the Crapaud Exhibition Board. This year also saw the provincial government sell a parcel of land to the Exhibition Association for $1.00 – land it had previously been leasing.

1999: The “new stage” was completed and ready for use inside the arena.

2000: The largest antique engine show in Eastern Canada is displayed at the Crapaud Exhibition.

2001: There were obvious changes to the format of this year’s Exhibition, with the collapse of the South Shore Arena’s roof during the previous winter. However, with determination – “the show went on!”

 

Incorporation and Leadership

 

The Crapaud Exhibition was Incorporated on June 17, 1954.The original Directors and Founders included:

  •  G. Max Thomson

  • John L. Nicholson

  • Robert N. Dawson

  • William Waddell

  • Bert J. Trowsdale

  •  Brent C. Wood

  •  John Simmons

  • Arthur Simmons

  • George Nicholson

  • Eric Lowther

Wendell Horton was initially employed as clerk. Max Thomson served as the first President of the Crapaud Exhibition, a seat he held for 25 years. John Nicholson served as the first Vice-President and Brent Wood, who served as President prior to Incorporation, was first Secretary.

 

Today, in the year 2002, 49 years after the formation of the Crapaud Exhibition Association, only William Waddell and George Nicholson remain from the original directors. The wives of Max Thomson (Doris) and Robert Dawson (Margaret) also remain, continuing to contribute, as their husbands did, to their community and the Exhibition.

Directors of the Crapaud Exhibition

1954

 

Max Thompson (President)

John Nicholson (Vice-President)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

George Nicholson (Red Poll)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

Arthur P. Simmons

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Robert Dawson

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

J. V. Moore (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Leroy Howatt (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

1955

 

Max Thompson (President)

John Nicholson (Vice-President)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

George Nicholson (Red Poll)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

Arthur P. Simmons

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Robert Dawson

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

J. V. Moore (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Leroy Howatt (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

1959

 

Max Thompson (President)

Arthur P. Simmons (Vice-President)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

George Nicholson (Red Poll)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Robert Dawson

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

Allison Lea (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Leroy Howatt (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

Gerald Best (Hogs)

 

1960

 

Max Thompson (President)

Arthur P. Simmons (Vice-President)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

George Nicholson (Red Poll)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Robert Dawson

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

Allison Lea (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Leroy Howatt (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

Gerald Best (Hogs)

 

1961

 

Max Thompson (President)

Arthur P. Simmons (Vice-President)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

George Nicholson (Red Poll)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Robert Dawson

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

Allison Lea (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Jack Nicholson (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Mrs. Joe Trowsdale (Domestic Science)

Frank Myers (Field Roots & Eggs)

Mrs. Donald MacLeod (Fruits & Flowers)

1962

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres.&Red Poll)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

 

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Win Bell (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

Allison Lea (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Jack Nicholson (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Mrs. Joe Trowsdale (Domestic Science)

Frank Myers (Field Roots & Eggs)

Mrs. Donald MacLeod (Flowers)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

 

1963

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Red Poll)

Brent Wood (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

 

Managing Committees

 

Lorne Ferguson (Horses)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Austin Smith (Short Horn)

Allison Lea (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Jack Nicholson (Handicrafts)

Parker Canfield (Poultry)

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Mrs. Joe Trowsdale (Domestic Science)

Frank Myers (Field Roots & Eggs)

Mrs. Donald MacLeod (Flowers)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

 

1972

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald

John Thompson

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Rogerson (Hereford & Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

 

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

Frank Myers (Field Roots & Eggs)

Mrs. Heath Macquarrie (Flowers)

1973

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald (Beauty Pageant)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

Mack Dixon

Earle MacDonald

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Frank Myers (Field Roots & Eggs)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Heath Macquarrie (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

 

 

1974

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald (Beauty Pageant)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

Mack Dixon

Earle MacDonald

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Frank Myers (Field Roots & Eggs)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. George Dixon (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

 

1975

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes & Field Roots & Eggs)

John Simmons (Field Crops)

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald (Beauty Pageant)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Earle MacDonald

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

John Thompson(Holstein & 4-H )

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. George Dixon (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

 

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

 

1976

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Field Root & Eggs & Potatoes)

Earle MacDonald

James Nicholson

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

Mack Dixon

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. George Dixon (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

 

 

1977

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

Marilyn Myers

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

Mack Dixon

John Nicholson

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations)

Ron Cutcliffe (4-H)

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

1978

 

Max Thompson (President)

George Nicholson (Vice-Pres. & Mg.Dir.)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

Marilyn Myers

Eric Lowther

B.J. Trowsdale

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Hogs)

Elmer MacDonald

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Eric Dixon

Mack Dixon

John Nicholson

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations)

Ron Cutcliffe (4-H)

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

Keith Boswall (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Elmer Smith (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

1981

 

Max Thompson (Honorary President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Saddle Horses)

Elmer MacDonald (President)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

Ron Cutcliffe (4-H)

Mack Dixon

John Nicholson

Anna Stewart

Arnold Stewart

 

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

John Haslam (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Colbourne Clow (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

1982

 

Max Thompson (Honorary President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Saddle Horses)

Elmer MacDonald (President)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

Arthur Simmons

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Managing Committees

 

Alva Walsh (Chairman)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

John Haslam (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Colbourne Clow (Holstein)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

 

1984

 

Max Thompson (Honorary President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Elmer MacDonald (President)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Lorna Nicholson (Secretary)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Don Craig

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations & Saddle Horses)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

Managing Committees

 

Colbourne Clow (Holstein)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

John Haslam (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

1986

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Debbie Carr (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Don Craig

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations & Saddle Horses)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

 

Managing Committees

 

Colbourne Clow (Holstein)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

John Haslam (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Mrs. Jean Canfield (Domestic Science)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Reg MacLure (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

1987

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Debbie Carr (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell (Poultry)

Robert Dawson (Potatoes  & Field Roots & Eggs)

Don Craig

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Gerald Dixon (Public Relations & Saddle Horses)

John Thompson (Holstein & 4-H)

Brent Wood

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

 

Managing Committees

 

Colbourne Clow (Holstein)

Boyd MacDonald (Saddle Horses)

Lorne Ferguson (Horses & Hon. Chair)

John Haslam (Ayshire)

Waldron MacPhee (Short Horn)

Boyd Dixon (Aberdeen Angus)

George MacMillan (Jersey & Guernsey)

Leroy MacKinley (Hereford)

Mrs. Gladys Lowther (Domestic Science)

Mrs. Mary Lea (Flowers)

Mrs. Doris Fall (Handicrafts)

Mrs. Robert Dawson (Fruits)

1988

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President)

Debbie Carr (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell

Robert Dawson

Don Craig

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Harleigh MacKay

John Thompson (4-H)

Gerald Dixon

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

 

1989

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Debbie Carr (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell

Robert Dawson

Don Craig

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Harleigh MacKay

John Thompson (4-H)

Gerald Dixon

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

 

1990

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President)

Debbie Carr (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell

Robert Dawson

Don Craig

Bertie Webster

Eric Lowther

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Harley MacKay

John Thompson (4-H)

Gerald Dixon

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

 

1991

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

John Nicholson

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Harleigh MacKay

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Bertie Webster

 

1993

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Harleigh MacKay

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Stephen Graham

Jim Colodey

Danny MacEwen

 

1994

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Superintendent)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren (Tractor Pull Chairman)

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Danny MacEwen

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Stephen Graham

Jim Colodey

1995

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Super.)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Danny MacEwen (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Stephen Graham

Jim Colodey

1996

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Super.)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Danny MacEwen (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Jim Colodey

 

1998

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Super.)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Danny MacEwen (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Jim Colodey

Shirley Nicholson

Steve Watts

Heather Dixon

Mary Webber-Cook

Lee Gauthier

2000

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Super.)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Danny MacEwen (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Jim Colodey

Shirley Nicholson

Steve Watts

Heather Dixon

Ian Nantes

Kari Ferguson

2001

 

Elmer MacDonald (President)

Eric Dixon (Vice-President & Chair Committees)

Gladys Lowther (Secretary)

George Nicholson (Managing Director)

Earle MacDonald (Grounds Super.)

William Waddell

Arnold Stewart (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

Anna Stewart

Charles Sherren

Gerald Dixon

Frank MacDonald (4-H)

John Walker

Gerald Best (Sheep)

Danny MacEwen (Tractor Pull co-Chair)

John Thompson (4-H)

Hilda Colodey

John Nicholson

Mack Dixon (Livestock Superintendent)

Jim Colodey

Shirley Nicholson

Steve Watts

Heather Dixon

Ian Nantes

Dave Tingley

 

Parades

 

Parades have been a part of the Crapaud Exhibition since PEI’s Centennial in 1973. While that was the first, and only year, for a while (there was one in 1967 – Canada’s Centennial year), they returned in 1992 as a regular part of the exhibition. Hot Dogs and Pop, served by members of the Crapaud Fire Department, are the traditional finish to the Crapaud Exhibitions’ “Kick-off” Parade. The Parade Route originally started at Englewood School, down the Trans Canada Highway and through the Village to Boyd MacDonald’s Warehouse on the Post Road. The route was a traffic concern on the Trans Canada Highway, so in 1998 its start-up was moved to the Westmoreland Road (now called Inkerman Rd.) on Rte 231. Still following part of its original route, the parade goes through the Village, continuing to stop at Boyd’s warehouse. A very important feature, for young and old alike, is the “throwing of candy” from the floats to the bystanders. Many a child has waited eagerly with a “bag in hand to fill”.

1987: Doll Carriage & Vehicle Parade for the children.

1992: The first parade since 1973 “gets going” at the Crapaud Exhibition boasted 25 floats.

1996: 38 entries participated in the Fair’s opening parade, at 10:30am on Saturday. Best Commercial winner went to Lowell Oakes Plumbing from Crapaud, Most Original to Kent Wood’s Dog Grooming, Crapaud, Best Children’s to The Shriner’s Club of Cornwall, and Most Humorous to The Millstream Seniors Club of Crapaud.

1997: The parade was moved from Saturday morning to Friday evening.

1998: The parade “start-up” moves from Englewood School to Westmoreland Road, site of the first PEI Exhibition, The Westmoreland Fair” in 1867. On Exhibition morning, 65 entries included Best Commercial winner – Gatorman Disposal, Most Original – The Blue Goose Restaurant from Desable, Most Humorous – Buttons the Clown, Best Children’s – Victoria Kindergarten.

1999: The parade moves to Friday evening, before the Saturday Exhibition. The concerts moved to Thursdays, leaving Friday evening open, and allowed Exhibitors and workers on Saturday to now see the parade.

2000: An evening parade, Friday before the Exhibition on Saturday.

2001: The evening parade again “kicks off” the event

 

Politicians & Dignitaries Attending

 

1954: The first Exhibition was officially opened By C.C. Baker, then Minister of Agriculture. Also in attendance were Premier Alex Matheson, S.C. Wright (Deputy Minister of Agriculture), and Frank Myers (M.L.A.)

1955: The second annual Exhibition was opened by  Eugene Cullen, Minister of Agriculture.

1956: The third annual Crapaud Exhibition was opened by Lieutenant Governor T.W.L. Prowse. Other dignitaries included Premier A.W. Matheson, J. Watson McNaught (MP), George MacKay (Minister of Highways) and Eugene Cullen (Minister of Agriculture).

1966: Jean Canfield (MLA First Queens), Frank Jardine (MLA Fourth Prince), Hon. Angus MacLean (MP), Lieutenant Governor J. George MacKay, Heath MacQuarrie (MP), Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Mr. White and Mr. (Justice) George J. Tweedy (who opened the fair).

1971: V.C. Smith, High Commissioner from Jamaica to Canada opened the 18th annual Crapaud Exhibition. Also in attendance was Lieutenant Governor J. George MacKay.

1972: Lieutenant-Governor J. George MacKay attended the event, with the fair being officially opened by Justice George J. Tweedy. Also in attendance were Frank Jardine (MLA Fourth Prince), Angus MacLean (MP), Lieutenant Governor J. George MacKay, Heath MacQuarrie (MP), and Mr. White (Deputy Minister of Agriculture).

1978: Heath Macquarrie, MP for Hillsborough presented Max Thompson with a plaque for his 25 years of service to the Exhibition, calling him the “guiding light” and the “leading spirit of the Crapaud Exhibition. Lieutenant-Governor Gordon L. Bennett and Provincial Opposition Leader, Angus MacLean officially opened the Fair (on it’s 25th Anniversary). Also in attendance were Dan MacDonald (Minister of Veteran’s Affairs), Jean Canfield (MLA and representing the government of PEI), Don Wood (MP for Malpeque), and Prowse Chappell (MLA for 4th Prince).

1982: Premier Jim Lee attended the event.

1984: Speaker of the P.E.I. Legislature, Marion Reid officially opened the exhibition with past-president, Max Thomson.

1985: Premier Jim Lee officially opened the 32nd annual Crapaud Exhibition.  Also present were Prowse Chappell (Agriculture Minister), Senator Heath Macquarrie, Mel Gass (Malpeque MP), Gordon Lank (Transportation Minister), Leone Bagnall (Minister of Education) and Arthur Hudson (President of the P.E.I. Association of Exhibitions).

1986: P.E.I. Agriculture Minister Tim Carroll, Arthur Hudson (President of the P.E.I. Association of Exhibitions), Senator Heath Macquarrie and Tourism Minister Gordon MacInnis.

1990: Prime Minister Jean Cretien attends the Crapaud Exhibition with Premier Catherine Callbeck.

1991: Lieutenant-Governor Marion Reid presented clocks to five of the remaining founder directors. Others in attendance included Malpeque Senator Heath Macquarrie, Malpeque MP Catherine Callbeck, Provincial Opposition Leader Leone Bagnall, MLAs Stavert Heustis and Marion Murphy.

1996: Lieutenant – Governor Gilbert Clements opened the ceremonies.

The Women’s Institute

 

The Women’s Institute, a staple of all exhibitions on the Island, first took part in the Crapaud event in 1954. That initial year saw the Women’s Institutes of Crapaud, Westmoreland and Lady Fane served the meals. Early dinners were always a ham dinner, potato salad and desserts. The charge for a full meal was about $2.00 to $2.50. Hams were purchased from the local “Clover Farm Store, run by Parker Canfield in the early years, and Hubert Harvey later. They were then cooked at the old “Crapaud Creamery”, sliced at the Clover Farm, and then chilled in the Creamery’s cold room until needed. Water for tea was run from the rink’s canteen into a big tub on the main floor.

Meals once served on glass dinnerware and stainless steel utensils now see disposable dishes as a time-saver. The women of the Crapaud Women’s Institute have been serving meals to as many as 1,000 people on exhibition day. A major fund-raiser for these women, it requires hard work and dedication and it is accomplished only with the cooperation of all community women, not just those as members in the Institutes. Eggs are cooked, potatoes mashed, pickles delivered, desserts made – all by women in the entire community. Letters are sent out across the community for assistance, and they are well received.

The Institute also organizes many of the displays and exhibits inside the rink, as well as much of the Domestic Science and Handicraft competitions.

In 1992 the Women’s Institute reported that the number of meals served were declining, possibly due to the addition of other canteens on the exhibition site.  So in 1993 the menu was changed to Barbecued Chicken, instead of the Ham, with salads and strawberry shortcake for dessert.

In 1994 the menu changed again to include an option of boiled “new PEI potatoes” instead of potato salad. The boiled potatoes were a popular hit, and have remained as a choice. The selection of desserts, baked by all women in the community, in 1999 included strawberry shortcake and pies.

Today, in 2002, all would agree, that the Exhibition just wouldn’t happen without the Women’s Institute.

 

 

 

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Contact Info

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Crapaud Exhibition Association
PO Box 153
20569 Trans Canada Highway
Crapaud, PEI,
C0A 1J0
Phone: (902) 658-2030 (Seasonal)

Email: admin@crapaudexhibition.com

For more contact information, please head on over to our Contact Us page